CE05 - Une énergie durable, propre, sûre et efficace

Waste enery as a local resource : towards optimized heat recovery – RECUPERTE

Waste energy as a local resource

Waste heat recovery represents so far an underused energy, likely to take a significant share of the energy mix at French and European levels. As a local resource, it is of main interest for territories engaged in energy transition policies, provided secure and planned development. The project will be run by a team of urbanists/geographers/environmental and energy scientists in the aim to analyse and optimize the use of industrial, urban and nuclear sources of heat.

Towards optimized heat recovery

The project consists in a comparative study of waste heat recovery operations in three main fields: industry (refinery, chemicals, data centres), urban services (waste management, sewage) and energy (nuclear power). Starting point is the observation that the reasons for low waste heat recovery rates are not primarily related to a lack of technical input, but rather to sociotechnical considerations. Making heat flows circulate in urban networks requires that different actors (industries, local authorities, district heating operators, heat users and producers) cooperate, which in turn requires new responses to be invented and stabilized. The recycling of urban waste heat is fraught with organisational, economical, political and social difficulties, in particular related to uncertainties regarding heat availability, financial sustainability or regulatory frameworks, and to a lack of social acceptance and local anchorage.

The research project aims at observing, testing and comparing the conditions for waste heat recovery in different sector by means of case studies of recovery operations implemented in two highly urbanized and industrialized French and Dutch areas -Lyon/St Etienne, Lille/Dunkerque, Rotterdam. In these areas, recovery and delivery projects are either planned of in run, in articulation with policies of industrial ecology. The 36 month project involves a pluridisciplinary team of researchers in planning, geography, environmental sciences and energy engineering.

Results are expected in three main areas. Regarding practical implementation, it will help in recycling untapped energy resources, and as a consequence in operationalizing low carbon urban transitions. By means of a sociotechnical and public policy analysis, it will contribute to the analysis of local energy transition processes by scrutinising an understudied energy source, which raises intriguing question to urban studies. Finally, the project aims to contribute to a pluridisciplinary approach to teaching territorial energy issues in graduate programmes in planning and engineering.

To be defined.

1. Fontaine & Rocher. Energy recovery on the agenda. Waste heat : a matter of public policy and social science concern, Journal of environmental planning and management, forthcoming.

The Recuperte project deals with waste heat recovery processes within urban systems. Recycled heat represents high potentials for energy saving, but is until now far underused. The issue has however been identified both in France and in other European countries, and tends to be addressed through incentive measures. In combination with the increased role of local authorities on energy issues, this creates a favourable background for the development of heat recovery and delivery in district heating networks.
The project consists in a comparative study of waste heat recovery operations in three main fields: industry (refinery, chemicals, data centres), urban services (waste management, sewage) and energy (nuclear power). Starting point is the observation that the reasons for low waste heat recovery rates are not primarily related to a lack of technical input, but rather to sociotechnical considerations. Making heat flows circulate in urban networks requires that different actors (industries, local authorities, district heating operators, heat users and producers) cooperate, which in turn requires new responses to be invented and stabilized. The recycling of urban waste heat is fraught with organisational, economical, political and social difficulties, in particular related to uncertainties regarding heat availability, financial sustainability or regulatory frameworks, and to a lack of social acceptance and local anchorage.
The research project aims at observing, testing and comparing the conditions for waste heat recovery in different sector by means of case studies of recovery operations implemented in two highly urbanized and industrialized French and Dutch areas -Lyon/St Etienne, Lille/Dunkerque, Rotterdam. In these areas, recovery and delivery projects are either planned of in run, in articulation with policies of industrial ecology. The 36 month project involves a pluridisciplinary team of researchers in planning, geography, environmental sciences and energy engineering. A guidance committee composed of representatives from local and expert institutions will act as a board of advice, guaranteeing that research questions and results are significant. Results are expected in three main areas. Regarding practical implementation, it will help in recycling untapped energy resources, and as a consequence in operationalizing low carbon urban transitions. By means of a sociotechnical and public policy analysis, it will contribute to the analysis of local energy transition processes by scrutinising an understudied energy source, which raises intriguing question to urban studies. Finally, the project aims to contribute to a pluridisciplinary approach to teaching territorial energy issues in graduate programmes in planning and engineering.

Project coordinator

Madame Laurence Rocher (UMR 5600 - ENVIRONNEMENT, VILLE, SOCIETE)

The author of this summary is the project coordinator, who is responsible for the content of this summary. The ANR declines any responsibility as for its contents.

Partner

EVS UMR 5600 - ENVIRONNEMENT, VILLE, SOCIETE

Help of the ANR 244,220 euros
Beginning and duration of the scientific project: December 2018 - 36 Months

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