CE28 - Cognition, éducation, formation

FLUency and Disfluencies in Discourse in neuroDegenerative diseases with or without a history of oral or written language neuroDevelopmental disorder – FluD4

Submission summary

The study of discourse is of particular interest for understanding the linguistic and cognitive difficulties of people with neurodegenerative diseases. Analyzing fluency and disfluencies (hesitations, reformulations, interruptions, errors, pauses, prosodic organization) in such studies is particularly crucial since they reflect a good command of language skills and allow us to distinguish between different types of impairments, in particular with regard to primary progressive aphasias (PPA). These are characterized by predominant deficits in language skills and are considered as atypical variants of Alzheimer's disease on the one hand and frontotemporal dementias on the other. A distinction is made between fluent - semantic and logopenic - and non-fluent variants of PPA. In an elderly population with or without neurodegenerative pathology (typical or atypical Alzheimer's disease and front-temporal dementias), this project aims to: 1) characterize the nature of the disfluencies observed during oral production of discourse and during reading; 2) specify the understanding of their neural and cognitive causes according to the type of disorders; 3) investigate the impact of a potential history of oral or written language developmental disorders on their manifestations.

Project coordination

Melanie JUCLA (UNITE DE RECHERCHE INTERDISCIPLINAIRE OCTOGONE LORDAT)

The author of this summary is the project coordinator, who is responsible for the content of this summary. The ANR declines any responsibility as for its contents.

Partner

EA4156 UNITE DE RECHERCHE INTERDISCIPLINAIRE OCTOGONE LORDAT

Help of the ANR 350,386 euros
Beginning and duration of the scientific project: December 2021 - 48 Months

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