CE02 - Terre vivante

Influence of effective population size on animal genome architecture – NeGA

Submission summary

Eukaryotic organisms exhibit strikingly complex gene and genome architectures whose origin remains largely debated. In 2003, Michael Lynch proposed that this complexity emerged thanks to non-adaptive forces. Under this hypothesis, many genomic traits would be controlled by the balance between the emergence of slightly deleterious variants and their fixation rate, which ultimately depends on the effective population size (Ne). Although appealing because it is based on universal principles of population genetics, Lynch's theory has rarely been tested empirically. Here, we will compare the genome architecture of closely related species with contrasted Ne in five different groups of animals. We will first evaluate the influence of Ne on the evolution of genome size and on the dynamics of transposable elements. Then, we will test if Ne has an influence on the gene structure (number and size of introns) and transcription complexity (number and frequency of alternative transcripts). In parallel, we will use modeling and simulations to understand the reasons for a possible lack of applicability and to ultimately redefine or refine the contours of Lynch’s theory.

Project coordination

Tristan Lefebure (LABORATOIRE D'ECOLOGIE DES HYDROSYSTEMES NATURELS ANTHROPISES)

The author of this summary is the project coordinator, who is responsible for the content of this summary. The ANR declines any responsibility as for its contents.

Partner

Inria Grenoble Rhône-Alpes Centre de Recherche Inria Grenoble - Rhône-Alpes
LEHNA LABORATOIRE D'ECOLOGIE DES HYDROSYSTEMES NATURELS ANTHROPISES
ISEM Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution de Montpellier
LBBE BIOMÉTRIE ET BIOLOGIE EVOLUTIVE

Help of the ANR 571,718 euros
Beginning and duration of the scientific project: February 2021 - 48 Months

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