CE19 - Technologies pour la santé

Bioadhesive membranes based on adsorption of biological tissues to nanoparticles – NANOBIOTAPE

Submission summary

The development of new biomedical technologies creates an increasing demand for improved types of adhesives able to be interfaced in a highly controlled and tunable manner with biological tissues. Current fixation methods are poorly satisfactory in this respect: mechanical fasteners, sutures and staples, are usually too damaging and induce unwanted inflammatory reactions; surgical polymer glues still suffer from insufficient strength, excessive swelling and/or toxicity. There is today a major unmet need for a biocompatible and easily-applicable technology to secure devices and implants onto the soft and highly hydrated surfaces of internal organs. The NANOBIOTAPE project integrates ex and in vivo evaluation into materials design to create a new type of bioadhesive surgical membranes.
The NANOBIOTAPE project starts from a paradigm-shifting approach to bioadhesion recently invented at ESPCI Paris. This method relies on the use of nanoparticle solutions or powders in place of polymer glues: adhesion is produced by the adsorption of the macromolecules composing biological tissues at the surface of particles. By tailoring these adsorption processes, the project team proposes to design novel adhesive membranes, which can bind to tissues during a surgical operation and be detached harmlessly on demand. These novel functional surgical tapes will be specifically devised for the development of improved surgical practices in the treatment of liver cancer, which is the 5th most frequent localization of cancer worldwide and has been increasing by almost 3% per year since 2000.
This multidisciplinary project is based on the close collaboration of four complementary teams uniting materials scientists to clinical researchers and practitioners in veterinary surgery and human hepatic surgery. Chemists and physicists from the Soft Matter and Chemistry laboratory at ESPCI Paris and the Centre des Matériaux at Mines ParisTech will design, fabricate and characterize the performances of the bioadhesive membrane. Veterinary surgeons from the Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d’Alfort and hepatic surgeons from the Centre Hépato-Biliaire at Paul Brousse Hospital will use these adhesives in vivo in animal models and assess their clinical relevance. They will be assisted by histologists to determine the biocompatility of the implants.
New surgical bioadhesives will be delivered that offer a new set of functions of interest to medical practitioners. These functions will be tailored to liver tissues and to procedures in hepatic surgery and could be rapidly transposed to other internal organs of interest. This research will provide the demonstrations of safety and effectiveness required prior to the first clinical trials. From a “One Health” perspective, the results obtained in NANOBIOTAPE will not only benefit to Human but also to companion animal patients in veterinary medicine. Discoveries and breakthroughs are also anticipated in the control of interfacial phenomena occurring between hydrogel-based devices and biological tissues.

Project coordination

Laurent Corté (ASSOCATION POUR LA RECHERCHE ET LE DEVELOPEMENT DES METHODES ET PROCESSUS INDUSTRIELS Centre des Matériaux de Mines ParisTech)

The author of this summary is the project coordinator, who is responsible for the content of this summary. The ANR declines any responsibility as for its contents.

Partner

ARMINES CdM ASSOCATION POUR LA RECHERCHE ET LE DEVELOPEMENT DES METHODES ET PROCESSUS INDUSTRIELS Centre des Matériaux de Mines ParisTech
MMC Laboratoire Matière Molle et Chimie
ENVA-B2OA Laboratoire de Bioingénierie et Biomécanique Ostéo-articulaires
INSERM U1193 Physiopathologie et traitement des maladies du foie

Help of the ANR 562,571 euros
Beginning and duration of the scientific project: - 48 Months

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